Betty Boop, Grampy’s House (1935)

When I was growing up, my aunt was and still is a huge fan of Betty Boop. Her name was Betty as well. She had given me a bunch of old VHS video tapes of Betty Boop and I literally wore them out watching them so much. I have a couple of favorite cartoons of Betty Boop, and this is one of them. I like the way Grampy was sort of an inventor. I also like Betty Boops Dog named “Pudgy”. If you like this cartoon or are a fan of Betty Boop you MUST check out this website: Betty Boop Cartoons. I love the 3D style of her cartoons. Some of the backgrounds are amazing, take a look next time when you watch her cartoons. Betty Boop was created by animator Grim Natwick, appearing in the Talkartoon and Betty Boop series of films produced by Fleischer Studios and released by Paramount Pictures. With her overt sexual appeal, Betty was a hit with film goers, and despite having been toned down in the mid-1930s, she remains popular today. She has been featured in two different comic strips, one in the 1930s and another in the 1980s. I hope you enjoy this one.

Betty Boop made her first appearance on August 9, 1930 in the cartoon Dizzy Dishes, the sixth installment in Fleischer’s Talkartoon series. The character was modeled after a combination of Helen Kane, the famous popular singer of the 1920s and contract player at Paramount Pictures (the studio that distributed Fleischer’s cartoons), and Clara Bow, who was a popular actress in the 1920s who had not managed to survive the transition to sound because of her strong Brooklyn accent which nevertheless became a trademark for Betty. The character was originally created in the mode of an anthropomorphic French poodle.

Max Fleischer finalized Betty Boop as completely human by 1932 in the cartoon Any Rags. Her floppy poodle ears became hoop earrings, and her black poodle nose became a girl’s button-like nose. Betty appeared in ten cartoons as a supporting character, a flapper girl with more heart than brains. In individual cartoons she was called “Nancy Lee” and “Nan McGrew”, usually serving as a girlfriend to studio star Bimbo.

Betty’s voice was first performed by Margie Hines, and was later provided by several different voice actresses including Kate Wright, Ann Rothschild (a.k.a. Little Ann Little), Bonnie Poe, and most notably, Mae Questel who began in 1931 and continued with the role until her death in 1998. Today Betty is voiced by Tress MacNeille and Tara Strong in Commercials.

Although it has been assumed that Betty’s first name was established in the 1931 Screen Songs cartoon Betty Co-ed, this “Betty” was an entirely different character. Though the song may have led to Betty’s eventual christening, any references to Betty Co-ed as a Betty Boop vehicle are incorrect. (The official Betty Boop website describes the titular character as a “prototype” of Betty.) In all, there were at least 12 Screen Songs cartoons that featured either Betty Boop or a similar character.

Betty appeared in the first “Color Classic” cartoon ‘Poor Cinderella’, her only theatrical color appearance (1934). In this film, she was depicted with red hair. In a cameo appearance in the feature film Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), in her traditional black and white, and voiced by Mae Questel, Betty mentioned that work had “gotten slow since cartoons went to color,” but she has “still got it, boo bee bah, doo!”

Betty Boop became the star of the Talkartoons by 1932, and was given her own series in that same year beginning with Stopping the Show. From this point on, she was crowned “The Queen of the Animated Screen.” The series was hugely popular throughout the 1930s, lasting until 1939. It is still tremendously popular today.

Thanks for reading,

Skrach

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