Nurses at JFK Medical Center go retro

At JFK Medical Center, health care reform is already under way, in the shape of a traditional white nurse’s cap.

The nurses in the Atlantis hospital’s cardiovascular step-down unit have temporarily tossed their royal blue scrubs for retro nurses’ whites – starched cap, hose and shoes included.

Atlantis:  Cheryl Farrell, rn, manager of the nurse at JFK Medical center's cardiovascular step-down unit WednesdayÊ in Atlantis. Nurses in the unit are wearing the traditional white nurses uniform instead of the colorful scrubs for a brief test period.

“It’s a little bit of an oddity,” admits registered nurse Corrine Harvey. “When we go to other departments in the hospital, the other nurses say, ‘Oh my god! You look so cute!'”

The eight-week experiment began about a month ago when the nursing staff was brainstorming ways to boost patient-satisfaction scores.

They saw room for improvement in this area: With so many hospital employees dressed in scrubs, patients had no visual clues as to who was their nurse, and who was an aide, an X-ray tech, a member of the transport team…

As a remedy, many hospitals nationwide have adopted color-coded uniform policies. St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach, for example, addressed the problem when it implemented a new uniform policy in February.

Nurses now wear white tops and blue pants, pediatric nurses wear kid-friendly tops, unit secretaries are clad in khaki, and all clinical departments are assigned specific colors.

The switch to a traditional-looking nurse’s uniform at JFK has already resulted in a greater respect for the profession, says Cheryl Farrell, nurse and manager of the cardiovascular step-down unit.

“If patients are on the phone when we walk in their room, they quickly say, ‘I gotta go, my nurse is here.’ They really pay attention.”

According to the results of a 2007 study at a large Midwestern health care center, patients and visitors perceived a nurse modeling a white uniform to be more professional than the same nurse modeling printed or solid-colored scrubs.

And the older the patient or visitor, the more likely they were to feel that way.

It’s the familiarity factor, says Rosemarie Hayes, JFK’s chief nursing officer.

Hospitals are big, intimidating, often-scary places, she says, “and any kind of comfort that you can give patients is good.”

Jon Cole, a 71-year-old Palm Springs resident recuperating from a traffic accident at JFK, said he likes the white uniforms. “Takes me back to when I was a youngster, and reminds me of the ’40s and ’50s when they were wearing them.”

Plus, he said, “It lets people know how hard they worked to get where they are.”

Can’t write much more.. I am sooo sleepy.

Thanks for reading,

Skrach

Advertisements
Published in: on April 27, 2010 at 10:29 AM  Comments (2)  
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://vividlyvintage.wordpress.com/2010/04/27/nurses-at-jfk-medical-center-go-retro/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. On behalf of JFK Medical Center and our nurses we want to thank you for this nice blog post. We appreciate your interest and positive feedback. Our nursing staff was excited to wear the traditional white uniforms and nursing hats, and patients seem to love it too!

    • Thank you for your comment. I really wish the hospitals near me would dress in the same style uniform. To me it looks professional, more so than the typical blue or colored scrubs. In the early 30’s and 40’s every uniform, daily dress, or outfit was very stylish and professional looking. I wish that the vintage clothing styles of those era’s would return in all industries and also in daily life.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: